NFL Film Breakdown: Minshew Mania

Bring your Football Knowledge to the Next Level

[jetpack_subscription_form subscribe_placeholder=”Email Address” show_subscribers_total=”false” button_on_newline=”true” submit_button_text=”Subscribe” custom_background_emailfield_color=”undefined” custom_background_button_color=”undefined” custom_text_button_color=”undefined” custom_font_size=”16″ custom_border_radius=”0″ custom_border_weight=”1″ custom_border_color=”undefined” custom_padding=”15″ custom_spacing=”10″ submit_button_classes=”has-text-color has-white-color has-background has-medium-blue-background-color” email_field_classes=”” show_only_email_and_button=”true” ]

Minshew Mania swept Duval after Nick Foles went down early in week 1 of the 2019 season. His penchant for late game heroics led them to a 6-7 record with him as the starter and gave Jacksonville hope for the future. His 3,271 yards, 21 touchdowns, and 6 interceptions gave the Jaguar offense a spark it has been missing for some years. His ability to move in the pocket, extend plays, and create something out of nothing single-handedly kept the Jaguars in games last year. His personality rallied his teammates around him and gave the front office confidence to ship out Nick Foles to the Bears and wait to draft a backup until the 6th round in 2020 NFL Draft. While the flashes Gardner Minshew showed were certainly enticing, he also had a number of moments where he looked exactly like a 6th round rookie quarterback. While he has enough arm strength to be successful, he has some mechanical issues with his footwork which cause him to be inaccurate, he struggles with anticipation throws, and without tying in his hips and feet, he really struggles with ball placement and power.

AP Photo / Stephen B. Morton

There’s no denying Minshew’s ability to create. Despite a tendency to bail from clean pockets at times, he is absolutely transcendent at manipulating the pocking, finding areas to escape from, and keeping his eyes downfield to find open receivers. He has surprising lower body strength and is able to evade tackles, understands how to maneuver to allow his linemen to get back onto blocks, and has the arm talent to make accurate throws even when he has pressure in his face or at his feet.

To play quarterback consistently in the NFL though, he also has to be able to thrive within the pocket. In his rookie year, consistency was not something that he had – at least mechanically. He would vary wildly from play-to-play in his base and footwork, hip rotation, and follow through. One play he’s standing strong in the pocket with all his cleats in the ground and the next, he’s hopping around, double clutching, and falling away on throws when nobody is near him.

The frustrating thing is that he can absolutely tie everything together since you actually see him do it multiple times a game. Below he stands strong in a collapsing pocket, keeps all his cleats in the ground, has full hip rotation, and throws a good ball to the back of the endzone for a touchdown.

Here he makes a quick decision, has a good drop (although with some heel click which we will talk about later) and throws an absolute dime. He brings his leg all the way through, has good follow through, points his toe, and puts it right on his receiver.

He shows he is capable and can read the leverage of the defender quickly, take good drops, keep a base just outside of his shoulders, and deliver nice balls like he does here to the back shoulder away from the defender.

Then you have plays like the one below where he takes a double step and throws the ball wide and into the dirt. If he’s throwing this ball based on his pre-snap read, that extra step is just wasted movement and delays his release. This kind of issue crops up over and over.

Here’s another double jab with his foot. This is a much more catchable ball this time but he still leaves his leg on the follow through which forces the ball to lack power and to end up on the back hip on the receiver, making the catch more difficult than necessary and preventing any potential run after the catch.

There’s no way to know what they’re telling him in the QB room but he routinely does these skip drops which cause him to be off balance on the throw and lead to inaccuracy and a lack of power. Here you can see how off balance he is on what should be an easy and routine throw directly in front of him 10 yards away. It lacks power and allows the defender to close on the ball and pop it into the air. He leaves his back foot as he throws, is falling away to his left, and can’t generate enough spin on the ball as a result.

Here you can see him double clutch on the ball. He knows he’s throwing it and yet there is hesitation. This gives the defense time to react to the throw and throws off his mechanics as he leaves his leg on the follow through. Without bringing his leg which allows for full hip rotation, he loses accuracy and power and the ball is way higher than it needs to be. If he put this ball right on the receiver in stride, it has the chance to be a touchdown. Instead you’re opening up your guy to a big hit.

On his hitch step, he also has a tendency for heel click to happen. Heel click is when your feet come together as you climb the pocket. Ideally you want to keep your feet spread to create a solid base. When they come together, you get a vertical bounce as a quarterback. This vertical movement up and down adds one more variable for you arm to compensate for. Now you have vertical movement up or down as you’re attempting to throw. It’s not the end of the world but will make you way less consistent from throw to throw. Compare this to his last clip where he leaves his leg. This time, he does a really good job of following through and bringing his leg on this throw though which is why he’s able to generate enough power to squeeze it into the receiver.

As mentioned before, he is almost always incredibly toesy. This does the same thing as heel clicks do. It creates a vertical bounce in your platform and also prevents you from digging your cleats in the ground and generating power to translate to your hips and subsequently your arm. When you hop on your toes, you’re going to struggle with proper hip rotation and will have to compensate for any vertical movement you’re experiencing. That is exactly what you see here. It’s possible he thinks that the receiver should be bouncing to the outside and is leading him that way, but there is a defender hanging there waiting for exactly that. Either Minshew threw to the wrong spot or he was inaccurate. Neither are ideal obviously.

Here’s a combination of Minshew being toesy and throwing in that extra foot jab on his drop which causes him to air mail a walk-in touchdown in the flats.

Is it all doom and gloom? Absolutely not. For the most part he makes decisive reads and is able to deliver catchable balls. His receivers and the scheme did him no favors as there were multiple issues with communication and bad play-calling without built in man-beaters nor audibles and hot routes for Minshew to take advantage of.

The raw talent and ability to move and create inside and outside of the pocket is maybe even the best in the league aside from Patrick Mahomes. He keeps his eyes downfield and it feels like he’s at home when everything is going wrong.

If Minshew can polish up the mechanical issues, there’s no doubt that he gives juice to the locker room in Jacksonville. The team believes in him and with a new weapon in Laviska Shenault to pair with DJ Chark, the issues of miscommunication, drops, and lack of ability to defeat man coverage may disappear. Once the game slows down and things click for Minshew, he can absolutely be a franchise quarterback. He is, after-all, a 6th round rookie quarterback who was never expected to start 13 games this year. He’s a gunslinger, cultural icon in Jacksonville, and made the Jaguars fun to watch again.

If you liked this post make sure to subscribe below and let us know what you think. If you feel like donating and want access to some early blog releases and exclusive breakdown content or to help us keep things running, you can visit our Patreon page here. Make sure to follow us on Instagram @weekly_spiral and twitter @weeklyspiral for updates when we post and release our podcasts. You can find the Weekly Spiral podcast on Spotify or anywhere you listen.

Bring your Football Knowledge to the Next Level

[jetpack_subscription_form subscribe_placeholder=”Email Address” show_subscribers_total=”false” button_on_newline=”true” submit_button_text=”Subscribe” custom_background_emailfield_color=”undefined” custom_background_button_color=”undefined” custom_text_button_color=”undefined” custom_font_size=”16″ custom_border_radius=”0″ custom_border_weight=”1″ custom_border_color=”undefined” custom_padding=”15″ custom_spacing=”10″ submit_button_classes=”has-text-color has-white-color has-background has-medium-blue-background-color” email_field_classes=”” show_only_email_and_button=”true” ]

NFL Film Breakdown: Why Hollywood Brown is the Real Deal

Marquise Brown quietly had a very explosive year for the Baltimore Ravens. While overshadowed by other standout rookie receivers like DK Metcalf, AJ Brown, Terry McLaurin, and even his own teammate with Lamar Jackson’s MVP campaign, Brown was still highly productive with 13.4 yards per reception, 46 catches, and 7 touchdowns on the year. He also showed up big for the Ravens in their playoff game with 7 receptions for 126 yards and his 4.32 speed showed up consistently on film and enabled him to stem defenders and make them turn their hips early, roll into speed cuts with surprising burst, and snap off routes to create space. He’s not afraid of contact over the middle, shows solid understanding and application of route technique, and takes advantage of the space people give him.

Note: If you prefer to watch a video breakdown, scroll to the bottom of this article.

Steve Mitchell-USA TODAY Sports

Hollywood Brown’s speed opens everything up for him. It gives him cushion to exploit, a long route track to work and force the defensive back to turn his hips, and gives him space to speed cut on intermediate routes. If you come up to press him and don’t get hands on him, he’s just too fast for most defenders to run with.

This speed can also be used horizontally on shallow drags too. It’s an effective way to get one of your fastest players in open space across the field without running him deep.

He can also use that pure speed to snap off routes and exploit the defenses fear of getting beat deep. He does a great job of working back to the ball and coming downhill after getting up and closing the cushion of corners and defenders. He can sometimes turn his head and shoulders a little early giving an indication he’s about to break his route off but overall he does a consistently good job and that’s something that can easily be worked on going into his second year.

Brown also does a great job rolling into speed cuts with barely any loss of speed. Speed cuts are exactly what they sound like. They’re cuts that don’t take a hard angle and are more rounded – enabling you to maintain speed as you run them. This is one of the defining characteristics of Brown. He is an incredibly smooth runner and easily creates separation especially in zone coverage when defenders are supposed to carry him and pass him off. He also attacks a zone faster than the defenders can get to it. In the second gif you can see the Cardinals running cover 3 and the corner #33 Byron Murphy bails to the deep third off the snap to protect deep and allows Brown to speed cut to the flats. The outside linebacker responsible for that area can’t get there fast enough and it’s an easy completion.

He combines his speed with route technique and manipulates defenders to open space for himself. He does a good job of running to the opposite shoulder of where he wants to go and forcing defensive backs to turn their hips that way, enabling him to then use his rolling cuts or soft angle switches like on posts to win route-side space. Since he’s so fast, one wrong move by the defensive back and it’s all over for them. While the last play is a bit of a busted coverage, it is also Hollywood Brown working to bust that coverage. The slot corner is carrying him up the seam and working to pass him off to the safety. As soon as Brown gives his inside move like he’s going to the post and the safety should be there to take over, the slot corner falls off. He then turns back and runs a corner, away from the safety creating a ton of space for himself.

Marquise Brown has all the makings of a top receiver in the NFL. He can absolutely be known as a deep threat receiver capable of gashing defenses on screens, deep balls, and in the intermediate passing game just like DeSean Jackson has done during his career. If the Ravens add another receiver that can take some attention off of Brown’s deep ball abilities, he could be absolutely lethal and should be good for at least one big explosive play a game. He consistently uses his speed and the defense’s fear of getting beat deep to get himself open through route running ability. If he were in a more pass-happy offense he would absolutely have the stats to match those of his 2019 rookie receiver classmates. The sky is the limit as the Ravens offense evolves and Lamar Jackson progresses as a passer. Marquise Brown is showing all the traits of a perennial deep target and difference maker.

If you liked this post make sure to subscribe below and let us know what you think. If you feel like donating and want access to some early blog releases and exclusive breakdown content or to help us keep things running, you can visit our Patreon page here. Make sure to follow us on Instagram @weekly_spiral and twitter @weeklyspiral for updates when we post and release our podcasts. You can find the Weekly Spiral podcast on Spotify or anywhere you listen.

Bring your Football Knowledge to the Next Level

[jetpack_subscription_form subscribe_placeholder=”Email Address” show_subscribers_total=”false” button_on_newline=”true” submit_button_text=”Subscribe” custom_background_emailfield_color=”undefined” custom_background_button_color=”undefined” custom_text_button_color=”undefined” custom_font_size=”16″ custom_border_radius=”0″ custom_border_weight=”1″ custom_border_color=”undefined” custom_padding=”15″ custom_spacing=”10″ submit_button_classes=”has-text-color has-white-color has-background has-medium-blue-background-color” email_field_classes=”” show_only_email_and_button=”true” ]

NFL Film Breakdown: The Power of Devin Singletary

Devin Singletary, taken with the 74th overall pick in the 2019 NFL Draft, one behind fellow running back David Montgomery averaged an impressive 5.1 yards per carry and 969 total yards. While his 4.3 yards per carry from shotgun were nothing to laugh at, his 5.8 yard average from under center really helped him steal away more carries as the year went on and edge out Frank Gore for more touches. Absolutely deadly in a power run game system and an incredibly tough and physical runner, Singletary did most of his damage between the tackles despite being only 5’7” and 203 lbs. Where he really struggled though, was in zone concepts and setting up and reading blocks. When he could follow a puller through the hole or get up on a linebacker, he could hit defenses for big chunks. However, when that didn’t happen he’d dance in the hole, had trouble reading open space blocks, and continually struggled to read zone scheme blocking.

Buffalo Bills running back Devin Singletary (26) Buffalo Bills vs Miami Dolphins at Hard Rock Stadium on November 17, 2019. Photo by Craig Melvin

Singletary is one of the most abrupt and explosive slashing-style runners there is in the league and his ability to cut and accelerate is special. He almost never goes down on first contact and can accelerate away from defenders.

His ability to get north and south in a hurry and follow blocks allows him to punish linebackers and second level defenders with his physicality. Singletary’s power on smaller defenders is a recipe for success for both him and the Bills who run a ton of power schemes to take advantage of exactly that skill set. The Bills love to run this center and tackle pull out of 12 personnel as the two tight ends down-block and the tackle kicks out while the center pulls and wraps through the hole. This allows for their athletic center to get through the hole and lead block for Singletary.

They’ll also do a similar pin and pull wrap concept with the playside guard and center allowing for the same type of hole and concept to open up for Singletary.

When Singletary encounters zone blocking, though, he has a really tough time. He tends cut too soon or read the holes incorrectly, dance in the hole, and show a lack of patience and understanding of the flow of the defense. You can see below an outside zone concept where if Singletary pushes outside and stays with his fullback, he has a clear lane down the sideline, instead, he stops his feet and tries to cutback right into flowing defenders. On the second gif, it’s 3rd and 1 and he has a clear lane following the double team to the right and he tries to cut back, getting tackled and resulting in a 4th down.

When he does sift through the traffic, he can often dance and do too much in the open field when he has the physical tools to run over or run away from defenders. He’ll often try to make one more slashing cut or step back which gives defenders time to recover and make a play on him – which coincidentally lead to a number of his fumbles where defenders are tackling him from unexpected angles. Below he makes a great initial read and then immediately makes another cut which allows defenders to recover and make the tackle.

Often he’ll go outside of blocks when he should be going inside and vise-versa.

Singletary’s style is a juxtaposition. On one hand, he’s incredibly physical and can explode through the hole while searching for contact on the sidelines. On the other, he dances, reads blocks poorly, and looks to cut to avoid any contact in the open field. His burst, lateral cuts, and ability to run in a power-based offense saves him from his current struggles when running zone. Excessive cutting and indecisiveness is common in first year backs so it’s not the end of the world. If he can master zone scheme reads, he has the tools to be a really really good back in the league. If he can’t he may end up being a utility piece and a guy that is relatively limited in the scheme his team runs and the amount of touches he subsequently gets. Despite all this, he as the tools and still produced at an impressive clip while sharing the backfield in his rookie season. With more weapons for the Bills outside in Stefon Diggs, the box may get lighter for Singletary and he could begin to feast on smaller linebackers and defenders in the Bills’ power run game.

If you liked this post make sure to subscribe here and let us know what you think. Make sure to follow us on Instagram @weekly_spiral and twitter @weeklyspiral for updates when we post and release our podcasts. You can find the Weekly Spiral podcast on Spotify or anywhere you listen. If you feel like donating to help us keep things running, you can visit our Patreon page here.

Follow Weekly Spiral

Get new content delivered directly to your inbox.

[jetpack_subscription_form show_only_email_and_button=”true” custom_background_button_color=”undefined” custom_text_button_color=”undefined” submit_button_text=”Subscribe” submit_button_classes=”undefined” show_subscribers_total=”false” ]

NFL Film Breakdown: Terry McLaurin – The Rookie Receiver with the Least Acclaim but the Most Pop

Terry McLaurin, taken in the 3rd round by the Washington Redskins, may end up being the best of the 2019 receiver class. He had the second highest PFF rookie receiver rating all time at 86.5 behind only Odell Beckham. Over his 14 games, McLaurin’s 919 receiving yards and 7 touchdowns trailed only AJ Brown out of the 2019 rookie receivers. In watching his film, he looks incredibly fluid and his cuts and ability to snap off routes looks effortless. He transitions incredibly well and his change of direction is deceptively explosive. He may have ranked behind OBJ’s rookie year, but his big play ability and running style looks shockingly similar. Let’s take a look at how Terry McLaurin accounted for 32.7% of Washington’s total passing yards in his rookie season and see where he needs to improve for a 2020 campaign with new head coach Ron Rivera.

MICHAEL BRYANT / STAFF PHOTOGRAPHER

The first thing that jumped out on film was the smoothness of his cuts. He runs speed cuts on digs and sails incredibly well and can also snap off fades and posts into curls and comebacks with suddenness and with the ability to create space. He can throttle down very quickly without demonstrably changing his stride length right before so it’s difficult for the DB to key his hips for the break. You can see in both gifs the amount of separation he gets as he speed cuts (rounding at the route at the top instead of a hard plant and flat cut) on the dig in the first gif and comes to a post sit on the second.

While he does create separation off these cuts, sometimes he doesn’t attack the ball and allows the defensive back to make up ground and impact the play. It doesn’t happen super often, but you’d love to see him working back towards the ball and attacking it in the air.

Because of his surprisingly long stride length, he can get up on defenders faster than they expect. He uses this to his advantage when stemming his routes towards the defender’s wrong shoulder before planting and getting into his route. Numerous times he forces safeties and corners to turn their hips right before planting and creating tons of space for himself.

Combine all these physical tools and understanding of how to manipulate defensive backs and you have a pretty complete receiver on your hands. He shows the ability to beat defenders quickly and then stack on top of them to really create separation for himself. By stacking back onto his route stem, the defender is now in a trail position and can easily be manipulated with shoulder and head nods before the cut. You can see two examples of just that below.

While he progressively became more willing to catch the ball in traffic and attack the ball in the air through the season, he isn’t the most physical receiver. At times he got easily washed off his mark. It’s important to fight to stay on the line of your stem because the further you get washed to the sideline or to safety help in the middle of the field, the harder the throw and catch is going to be.

The talent is absolutely there for McLaurin. There’s not a lot of receivers that can make the play like the one below reaching back for a one handed catch running full speed.

However, there is one area of concern that consistently cropped up on the film. His effort was pretty abysmal in the blocking game and when the play didn’t directly involve him. As soon as the ball is out and not going to him, he’s done and there’s no effort to block for his teammates or stay involved in the play even when the ball carrier is running right at him.

If it was one play that’d be fine, but it’s multiple and spanning through many games in the season.

Is it the worst thing in the world for your rookie receiver to lack effort in the blocking game? Of course not. If you’re Washington though, you’d hope that he and Haskins are the faces of your franchise for years to come and tone setters for the offense. I think a culture shift like one that Ron Rivera will bring could get McLaurin to buy in in the run game and make him a problem for defenders to deal with every snap that he’s on the field for. Whether he’s blocking, running a clear out, or catching a slant and taking it to the house, you need effort and intensity from your best players to build a winning culture.

There’s a lot to love about Terry McLaurin. The talent is clearly there to be a top level receiver in the NFL. From his ability to stretch the field, change direction, and the fluidity and understanding of route techniques, he can be a difficult task for any defender. As he polishes some of his techniques like working back to the ball and being more physical during his routes, he can open up the Washington offense. Considering the Redskins only had 2,812 passing yards last year, there’s only room for him to grow statistically. He’s flying under the radar for now, but I wouldn’t be at all surprised to see him putting up 1,200 yards and 10 touchdowns next year as he helps keep the Redskins competitive in a relatively weak NFC East.

If you liked this post make sure to subscribe here and let us know what you think. Make sure to follow us on Instagram @weekly_spiral and twitter @weeklyspiral for updates when we post and release our podcasts. You can find the Weekly Spiral podcast on Spotify or anywhere you listen. If you feel like donating to help us keep things running, you can visit our Patreon page here.

Follow Weekly Spiral

Get new content delivered directly to your inbox.

[jetpack_subscription_form show_only_email_and_button=”true” custom_background_button_color=”undefined” custom_text_button_color=”undefined” submit_button_text=”Subscribe” submit_button_classes=”undefined” show_subscribers_total=”false” ]

NFL Film Breakdown: David Montgomery Can Change the Identity of the Bears Offense

David Montgomery was selected in the 3rd round of the 2019 NFL draft out of Iowa but quickly found himself in the starting role for the Chicago Bears. After only 6 carries in week one he had 18 carries in week 2 and never had below 11 touches except for week six against New Orleans. With some struggles run blocking on the offensive line, Montgomery’s 889 yards on a 3.67 yards per carry average wasn’t much to write home about. However, Montgomery consistently showed great short area quickness, incredibly physical running, and ran with power and excellent contact balance. While he didn’t excel at any particular type of run, the tape showed more promise than his stats did.

Montgomery’s one cut, slashing, and physical style of running is awesome to watch when it hits. Despite the offensive line issues, Montgomery would have a few runs a game where he looked like a running back that was just more powerful and stronger than the defenders meeting him in the hole. That is incredibly promising for a rookie who hasn’t had a full offseason to build strength yet.

Tannen Maury/EPA-EFE

Here you can see that exact power on a split zone by the Bears against the Chiefs. The playside is walled off so Montgomery sticks his foot in the ground and explodes into the cutback lane off of the backside tackles butt. If the H back #81 gets actual contact on the unblocked end for the “split” in the split zone, it’s a big gain. This lack of contact and blocking by #81 in split zone is actually a recurring issue throughout the season and he routinely misses the block. As it is, though, Montgomery instead meets the defensive end head on and bounces right off of him and continues to move his feet while four defenders rally to bring him down.

This physicality is my favorite part of Montgomery. He runs absolutely violently and never gives up on a run. If he’s still standing, his legs are still moving and driving for extra yards. That kind of energy can be contagious to a team and set a tone.

Combine this power with his ability to slash and make people miss in holes when the offensive line misses a block and you’ve got what looks like a special running back on your hands. In the first gif you can see him leave Sean Lee #50 stuck in the ground. Not a lot of running backs of his size and power can change direction like that.

His lower body power is incredibly impressive and gives him the ability to be shifty in combination with his power. So now defenders don’t know if he’s going to plant and go the other direction or run them over. Sometimes, he’ll do both in one play.

 The problem is, when the offensive line is getting stonewalled and manhandled, Montgomery can only do so much. The line and tight ends struggled consistently through the season to open up space for Montgomery. In the first gif you can see again the split flow concept from earlier with a motioning tight end (guess who? #81) and he takes a bad angle and knocks the defender into the running lane to make the tackle. The next gif he comes across the formation and just completely misses the end altogether.

You see double teams being split or neutralized, missed assignments, and linemen leaving defensive tackles to climb to the linebacker before someone else has secured their block. It gets rough and if there’s one knock on Montgomery, it’s that at times he can be indecisive in hitting his holes, take bad tracks in the run game, and, like most rookie running backs, has a tendency to bounce things outside – perhaps in large part because of his lack of trust in the offensive line. Part of the aging and experience process of being a running back in the NFL is understanding that every play doesn’t need to be a home run. Three to four yards is a win on some plays. Anything more is just icing on the cake. Especially in the second gif, if he continues on his initial track he has a solid gain, instead he bounces for the cutback and to get outside and is immediately met by a defender.

With a commitment to the run game and some pieces on the offensive line, the Bears can absolutely be a dominant run team with Montgomery as the number one back. His combination of explosive cuts and power flashed consistently throughout the season. On the flip side, so did his tendency to bounce plays away from their designed holes and his impatience in setting up blocks on inside zone to take advantage of flowing linebackers. Both things are easily fixable and tend to come with experience. While the ifs continue, if the Bears get a semblance of an offensive line and if they can keep defenses honest through the air, Montgomery can easily exceed 1,000 yards rushing and score 10+ touchdowns in the 2020 season.

If you liked this post make sure to subscribe here and let us know what you think. Make sure to follow us on Instagram @weekly_spiral and twitter @weeklyspiral for updates when we post and release our podcasts. You can find the Weekly Spiral podcast on Spotify or anywhere you listen. If you feel like donating to help us keep things running, you can visit our Patreon page here.

Follow Weekly Spiral

Get new content delivered directly to your inbox.

[jetpack_subscription_form subscribe_placeholder=”Email Address” show_subscribers_total=”false” button_on_newline=”true” submit_button_text=”Subscribe” custom_background_emailfield_color=”undefined” custom_background_button_color=”undefined” custom_text_button_color=”undefined” custom_font_size=”16″ custom_border_radius=”0″ custom_border_weight=”1″ custom_border_color=”undefined” custom_padding=”15″ custom_spacing=”10″ submit_button_classes=”has-text-color has-background-color has-background has-primary-background-color” email_field_classes=”” show_only_email_and_button=”true” ]